familywear

5 Ethical Children Wear Brands To Know

July 6, 2018

Finding organic kids wear has in some ways been easier than sustainable adult clothing, mainly because parents are willing to pay a premium to ensure that their children receive the best quality products as possible. Recently there has been an explosion of sustainable kids wear brand using organic cotton and modern designs. Here are 5 organic kids wear clothing brands to know, from those that have been around since before sustainable clothing became a ‘fashionable’ topic to newly launched brands.

Piccallily

Piccallily has been around for over 10 years and prides itself on using organic cotton sourced from a specific community called Chetna Organic in Hyderabad, India. Their mission is to improve the livelihood of smallholder farmers, by giving the farmers a  10% share in the factor and thereby using an innovative model of sustainability and community development. Picallily is also passionate about ensuring that their apparel is not made by underage workers, a reminder of the widely known issue that many garment workers in developing countries are children themselves. If transparency is important to you, this is a fantastic brand that has a range of printed fun clothing for children aged 0 to 10 years old. Designs include fun animal faces (the tiger being the best according to my niece) nautical and other whimsical prints. Worldwide shipping is available.

www.piccallily.co.uk

Minimal

Minimal describes itself as ‘gender-neutral’ ethical clothing and offer organic, casual clothing for hip kids aged 2 to 8 years old. The brand was founded in Singapore in 2016 by Husband Molly Leis and Jason Cornelius (originally from New York) because they found that the heavily patterned kids wear on offer promoted outdated social norms. They set out to create a range of understated luxury childrens’ wear that suited their belief that children should be confident individuals not focusing on what they wear. The brand currently offers t-shirts, tank tops, joggers, shorts and hoodies in classic minimalist colours such as black, white, grey and navy.

www.WeAreMinimal.com

Frugi

British based brand Frugi won The Queens Award for entrepreneurship in 2014 and the company prides themselves on using super soft organic cotton with quirky and colourful printed motifs. The whimsical style makes for an eye catching collection and ‘British-Mum-favorites’ include their 100% waterproof jackets made from recycled plastic bottles.The wide range of clothing on offer also includes shoes and outwear for kids from 0 to 4 years old. They offer worldwide shipping.

www.WeLoveFrugi.com

Hunter & Boo

Sourced from Sri Lanka, Hunter and Boo is a Singapore based ethical kids wear brand that prides itself on modern, ethical baby and children’s wear. The brand was founded by sisters Beth and Sarah Medley in 2015 and parents will be happy to know that not only are the clothes made from 100% organic cotton, they also use eco dyes. Eye catching modern prints inspired by their British heritage and with a local twist include one pieces, tops, bottoms and cute as a button printed dresses from 0 to 5 years. Our favourite print is the tropical themed Palawan currently available online at the time of print. The website also offers organic skincare from other brands for both Mum and baby from USA and Australia.

www.HunterandBoo.com

Patagonia

The grand-daddy of sustainable clothing, Patagonia, also offer a range of sustainable kidswear. Focusing on their core product, outwear, their summer collection also includes printed T-shirts, rompers, swimwear for kids and the most important summer holiday staple the rash vests. Patagonia also offer a platform to mend or sell unwanted clothing here to help extend the life cycle of garments.

www.Patagonia.com

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